Gay Marriage Timeline 2013

Gay Marriage Timeline 2013

Gay Marriage Timeline 2013. Issues like equal rights and gay marriage are ever growing and developing, often with a long and detailed history of pivotal events behind them. To coincide with the new ruling against the Defence of Marriage Act (DoMA) in the U.S, we have created an up-to-date timeline documenting the LGBT community’s battle for equal marriage rights so far.

The U.S Supreme Court has recently attracted a lot of attention for its involvement in a movement of increasing momentum as, though opinions were divided, the majority ruled against a law defining marriage as a strictly heterosexual process, giving hope of more rights for many same-sex couples.

This is the latest milestone of a journey that dates back thousands of years, as our timeline shows; the fight is perhaps not over but another important step has been made as opinions slowly turn and support gathers. To those fighting for their rights, we salute you!

Due to the recent news, SimplyBridal has revamped our Gay Marriage Timeline for 2013, new and exciting changes are constantly occurring in the LGBT community. We are so excited to be covering it them, and reminding people of the long struggle for equal rights. Chicago Gay Wedding DJ.

Gay Marriage Timeline 2013

3 Ways to Avoid Wedding Day Regrets

3 Ways to Avoid Wedding Day Regrets

3 Ways to Avoid Wedding Day Regrets. I’m sure you’ve heard it a million times, but you’re wedding day will go really fast. When it is all over with, you want to be able to look back and know that you made the most of the day and captured as many memories as possible. While planning the wedding, it is easy to get caught up in the budget and traditional must do’s, but there are some reoccurring things that brides often say they regret. Here is how you can avoid making the same mistakes.

Splurge on the videographer

Most couples skip the videographer due to budget restraints. They figure the photographer will capture all the major moments, so there is no need for a videographer. The truth is photos don’t let you relive your tear-filled vows, or re-listen to the speech given by your best man or let you re-watch your best friend’s attempt to do a split on the dance floor. If you can’t afford a videographer, at least ask someone who is good with a video camera to capture some of the most important moments.

REM Video Photography

R.E.M. Video & Photography

Don’t only order a few prints

Photographers offer a variety of packages with the option of prints, a disk with all the photos, or a combination of the two. Even if you decide to have the photographer print and assemble your wedding album, you should splurge on the disk with all the images. It can be overwhelming to choose from all the pictures and you might later wish you could print other images you didn’t originally choose.

whaley picture

Timothy Whaley & Associates

Take plenty of family photos

You may be tempted to rush through photos so you can enjoy the cocktail hour and start the reception, but don’t forget to take plenty of family photos. It isn’t that often that you have the whole family together (with everyone dressed up), so don’t miss the opportunity to get some great pictures.

hazelton photography

Hazelton Photography

These are just a few of the regrets brides often have. The key to avoiding regret is taking the time to enjoy every moment and capturing as many memories as you can so you always remember your special day. While you don’t want to blow your entire life savings on one day, you do want to make sure it is special, so do the things that are most important to you.

What’s in a Name?

The time honored tradition of a woman taking her husband’s name once they are married is a beautiful way to mark your entrance into a new family and for a couple, the beginning of your own family.  For years now, the options of how , when and if you change your name at all leave a lot of room for personal decision.  Whatever you choose to do, whether you change your name or keep your maiden, both are more than acceptable by today’s standards.

maiden name

If you should decide to change your name, the task can be daunting. We have pulled the latest to-do checklist to help out our brides and get them organized for legally binding themselves to a new husband AND a new name. But, before that, we have a few new ideas and maybe even a few compromises for those brides who are on a the fence.

http://www.dreamstime.com/-image7512611

  1. Don’t change. Whoever says you HAVE to have the same name as your husband is seriously living in the dark ages. Women are heads of households and heads of corporations- either way they have earned their right to keep the name that helped them get there. For professional reasons, a lot of women simply don’t have the option to change their name due to years of hard work and PR to gain name recognition in their respective fields. Many doctors, lawyers, and well known figures opt to keep their names professionally and change their name for things like banking, tax filings, and personal use. Others go for a hyphenated version of their name where both names are proudly represented.  Which brings us to our next option…
  2. When in doubt- Hyphenate! Hyphenating your name is a very modern way to go and can be quite convenient if you decide to share both of your last names with your kids.  The hyphenate 2 last names almost become like one name for your entire family and equally represents both sides for your children to carry on.
  3. Name change Anniversary gift? We have heard of many women changing their name on their first, fifth or even tenth anniversaries! We think this is a really cool way to honor your husband and show the journey to becoming one.  Some gals also like the idea because they want to really emphasize the importance of giving up their name for their husband’s and also marking the big accomplishment of the years they have already put in.

And here is our name-changing checklist courtesy of The Knot ( For whatever way to decide to go!)

1. Get your marriage license 
Before you can change your name, you’ll need the original (or certified) marriage license with the raised seal and your new last name on it. Call the clerk’s office where your license was filed to get copies if one wasn’t automatically sent to you.

2. Change your Social Security card 
Visit the Social Security Administration’s website and fill out the application for a new Social Security card. You’ll keep the same number — just your name will be different. Mail in your application to the local Social Security Administration office. You should get your new card within 10 business days.

3. Change your license at the DMV 
Take a trip to the local Department of Motor Vehicles office to get a new license with your new last name. Bring every form of identification you can lay your hands on — your old license, your certified marriage license and — most important — your new Social Security card.

4. Change your bank accounts 
This one’s a biggie, especially if you’re setting up a joint bank account, or if you have one already set up. The fastest way to change your name at your bank is to go into a branch location — bring your new driver’s license and your marriage license. You should request new checks and debit and credit cards on top of changing the name attached to your accounts. Something to note: You might get hit with fees for requesting a new debit card.

4. Fill in the blanks 
Once you have a social security card and driver’s license in your married name, other changes should be fairly easy. Some places only require a phone call; others may ask for a copy of your marriage certificate or social security card. Be sure to notify:

Employers/payrollSS card
Post office
Electric and other utility companies
Credit card companies
Schools and alumni associations
Landlord or mortgage company
Insurance companies (auto, home, life)
Doctors’ offices
Voter registration office
Investment account providers
Your attorney (to update legal documents, including your will)
Passport office

 

Don’t Be a Bride-to-be Who Misuses Social Media

Social media is a great way to stay connected with friends and family and to share and find ideas. However, there are always those people who abuse social media and annoy their followers. If they aren’t careful, brides-to-be can easily become that friend. Here are a few ways to avoid becoming the annoying bride on Facebook.

Wait to Change Your Relationship Status

Of course you are excited to change your status from “in a relationship” to “engaged,” but don’t do it too quickly. Make sure you share the news with close friends and relatives before posting it online. People who are important to you should hear the news from you and your fiancé not the internet.

 

Go Easy on the Ring Pictures

We know you love the new diamond engagement ring sparkling on your hand, but your Facebook friends don’t want to look at constant pictures of you modeling the rock. A close-up or two to share with friends and family who won’t get to see the ring in person is fine, but don’t become obsessed with modeling your new accessory.

Beware the Countdown

An occasional update on the nearing date is fine, but don’t be the bride who writes a countdown post every day. Also, on the day of, fight the urge to give minute by minute countdowns. No one wants to read their news feed and find “Three more hours until I get married” followed by “Two more hours until I get married.”

Send Thank You Cards

Posting about your shower and all the great gifts is fine, but don’t forget about thank you cards. A thank you on Facebook is not the same as a handwritten thank you in the mail.

A Few Pictures Will Suffice

Everyone wants to see pictures of your big day, especially people who weren’t able to attend, but they don’t want your photos constantly showing up in their newsfeed. Create one album and fill it with your favorites. You don’t need to include every single photo.

Enjoy Your Honeymoon

After the wedding, you should be looking forward to quality time with your new hubby not uploading photos and creating a new status every ten minutes. Take a break from social media while on vacation and share some photos and details when you return. No one expects constant updates while you’re honeymooning.

 

How to Handle a Momzilla

Brides often get a bad rep for being bridezillas, but the mother-of-the-bride can be just as demanding and troublesome. If your mom (or the mother-of-the-groom) is getting a little out of hand, use these simple tips to help save the peace at your wedding.

Warn Others

If you are dealing with a Momzilla, don’t keep it a secret. Warn your wedding planner and other vendors. They can help you handle a Momzilla who is interfering with your wedding plans, and they will appreciate knowing in advance what to expect. For instance, if you don’t tell the DJ to ignore all song requests from your over-involved mom, you may end up listening to all of your mother’s favorite songs at the wedding instead of the songs you and your fiancé requested. While you should consider your parents’ opinions, the day ultimately belongs to you and your fiancé.

Plan Ahead

If you know you will be dealing with a Momzilla, make plans before she can interfere. For instance, if your Momzilla will be too outspoken about the dress you wear, go shopping with friends to find the perfect dress. Then take your mom back to see the gown once you have made a decision about the dress you want.

Keep Her Busy

Momzillas want to be involved, and they will be very offended if you don’t take any of their suggestions. To avoid an argument, choose a task that isn’t too important to you and assign it to the Momzilla. This could be something simple like creating the welcome bags for out of town guests or something more involved such as the rehearsal dinner. Giving the Momzilla a job will not only make her feel involved, but it will also keep her busy so you can get more important planning done.

 

Happy wedding planning, and best of luck dealing with your Momzilla.

Pinterest: Pins of the Week

We’re not sure if it’s a pre-spring sweet tooth a post-Valentine’s Day crash, but this week on Pinterest, we were all about cakes.  And surprisingly, we noticed a trend with our cake pins.  Lately we are all about the sweet and simple.


Back to Basics
.  We couldn’t help but appreciate the surprising simplicity of this wedding cake: white, two tiers, smooth fondant, and minimal extras. In an age of giant cake competitions and a pop culture craze for ultimate cakes, we kind love how classic and simple this cake is.

 A Cake Ball Cake.  This cake upped the ante and went for a fun double effect, cake with cake balls.  And though the concept might sound a little strange, we’re loving the effect.  The subtle ombre and the awesome sense of texture keep it interesting, but not the slightest bit overworked.  Now we’re just wondering how difficult that cake is to cut!

Perfect for a Petite Fete.  Though we love a big party, we can also appreciate a smaller, more intimate gathering.  And if that’s the case, why mess with a multi-tier cake?  Go for the unexpected yet simple.  The decadent chocolate pour adds just the right touch of pizzazz, and we think this cake would be perfect for an afternoon celebration or a romantic garden party.  Love this cake, but not quite sure if it’s “wedding” enough?  Think about it for a bridal shower, family luncheon, or morning after brunch treat!

How To Tell If Your Wedding Budget is Too Strict

Everyone knows weddings can be expensive, and unless you happen to have parents (or in-laws) who are millionaires, wedding planning typically involves compromise. However, that doesn’t mean that every decision should be based on price. It is okay to plan a budget-savvy wedding, but be careful not to become too strict; you might later wish you had planned a wedding more suited to your dreams. Here are two ways to tell if you might regret your cost-cutting ways.

You’re Settling

If you are settling on a place because it is the cheapest or choosing a wedding dress because it is on the clearance rack, you may want to reconsider what is important to you. Could you make coffee at home for the next few months instead of visiting the local coffee shop to help you pay for the dress you really want? Could you have the wedding on a Sunday or Friday to save money on the venue you really love? Compromise doesn’t have to mean settling for the cheapest option.

You’ve Become Obsessed

For some people, saving money can become an obsession. You get so excited about saving money that you focus all your attention on how much more you can save instead of focusing on the wedding plans . You are no longer choosing invitations or favors or flowers because they fit your wedding theme but because they are a good price. There is a line between budget-savvy and cheapskate. Try to stay on the right side.

There are plenty of ways to save money on a wedding. You don’t have to sacrifice the wedding of your dreams to make it happen. Instead, figure out which details are important to you and look for ways to cut spending in other areas of your life. Also, get creative with your wedding details. Just because you are on a budget doesn’t mean you have to wear a discounted dress in an unflattering style and host the reception at a venue with broken toilets. Find some balance and you can have a beautiful wedding and a healthy bank account.

Premarital Counseling: Is it for You?

Counseling often has a negative stigma attached to it prompting some couples to shy away from premarital counseling, but how do you know if it’s right for you? Attending premarital counseling seems like it is an admission of relationship issues, but in reality, it can help perfectly happy couples build even stronger marriages. With high divorce rates, many couples don’t have healthy role models to look to for guidance. Premarital counseling sessions can equip couples with the tools and knowledge to safeguard their marriages against stress, division, and disappointment. Here are four areas that can be improved by meeting with a counselor before the wedding….

Communication: The key to any healthy relationship is open and honest communication. Premarital counseling gives you the opportunity to express your fears, expectations, and anticipation about the upcoming wedding and marriage in a safe environment. By doing so, you and your soon-to-be spouse will learn how to effectively communicate with one another, an invaluable tool that will be needed throughout your lifetime together.

Expectations: Everyone has expectations about marriage, however common or unique, that have been picked up through the years from witnessing healthy and unhealthy relationships around them. Premarital counseling is the ideal place to discuss these expectations with your partner and eliminate future disappointment. Learning your mate’s expectations and sharing your own will equip you to build a marriage that’s equally satisfying to both of you.

Responsibilities: Each partner plays a significant role in the marriage, but how do you know what responsibilities your spouse is expecting you to take? Engaging in open dialog about the roles and responsibilities you’ll each take on will save you unnecessary frustration and disappointment down the road. Premarital counseling opens the door for you both to discuss and decide how you’ll divide the load, whether it’s with finances, cleaning, career, or child-rearing.

Values: By now, you probably have a very strong idea of where your partner stands on most issues, but what about things that may arise in the future? How do you want to raise children? Will you be dedicated to one religion? What are your views on family? These are huge issues that, when undecided, can place a huge strain on any relationship. A premarital counselor can open your eyes to the ideals that matter most to you as individuals and as husband and wife.

S**T Brides Say

A YouTube video called “S**T Brides Say” has gone viral. So far, the video has over 500,000 views.  The video good-heartedly pokes fun at the bizarre and amusing things brides say and do. Here are a few scenarios from the video that you are probably guilty of.

1)      Describing your wedding theme or style in confusing and contradicting terms. Sure, you know exactly what you mean when you say “vintage modern,” but people who are listening to you are probably wondering what exactly you’re talking about.

2)      Being insensitive to your bridesmaids and/or guests, a.k.a. being a Bridezilla. Sure, you just want your bridesmaids to look and feel beautiful on your big day, but suggesting they join a gym, get a make-over, etc. is not the best idea.

3)      Getting emotional when you find “the dress.” Of course, you are excited, but someone who doesn’t understand probably thinks you sound ridiculous.

4)      Overestimating your ability to DIY. Sometimes DIY wedding projects are a great way to save money and create unique wedding details, but brides-to-be are famous for taking on more projects than they can handle.

Wedding planning can be stressful, so take a moment to laugh. After you’d watch the video, we’d love to know which scenes reminded you of yourself.

Avoiding Conflict

Your wedding day is supposed to be magical and special, full of love and joy, but all too often, drama creeps in and conflict abounds. Here’s a few easy ways to avoid conflict on some hot-button issues.

How to avoid conflict…

When choosing bridesmaids: Whether you agree or not, there are probably a few people in your life who will naturally assume they’re going to be a part of your wedding party. Ultimately, this decision is up to you and you should never feel bullied into including someone in your wedding. Adding additional bridesmaids or groomsmen adds more stress (in keeping track of everyone), more expense (in the cost of gifts and rehearsal dinner), and, well, more people to the day. However, if you’re fearful that excluding someone will cause more trouble than it’s worth, there’s no hard and fast rule on the number of bridesmaids you can have. Or, simply ask that person to serve in another way, such as a program attendant, scripture reader, or honorary bridesmaid.

When determining the guest list: Narrowing down your wedding guest list can be tricky business, especially when you’re working hard to include friends, family, co-workers, and guests of your parents and future in-laws, but if you’re working within a budget, most likely, trimming the guest list is an absolute necessity. To avoid drama, allot a certain number of invites for your parents and in-laws. Then, sit down with your fiancé and begin categorizing your potential guests into lists based on importance and closeness. Worse case scenario, send out a first round of invites, wait for RSVPs, and then follow up with a second round of invites to less-close acquaintances.

When deciding whether or not to invite children: Choosing to host an adults-only affair, especially for your reception, is completely legitimate, but before you make the decision, think long and hard about the implications. If you have close relationships with a lot of children (i.e. nieces, nephews, cousins, friends with young kids), it might be hurtful to exclude them from your day. However, if you’re worried about your beautiful reception turning into a scene from Chuck E. Cheese, don’t back down on your stance about keeping the guest list to 18 and over. Instead of including the words “adults only” on your invitations, simply be sure to write only the names of invited guests on the envelopes (i.e. Mr. and Mrs. Smith, as opposed to the Smith family). If you notice that a family RSVPs for more guests than you included, simply call them and explain that the affair is strictly for adults.

When trying to involve your fiancé in the planning: Men often take a backseat when it comes to wedding planning for a number of reasons. Maybe they don’t care about floral arrangements, maybe they’re at a loss for what to do, or maybe they simply don’t realize you need or desire their help. Whatever the case, if you’d like your groom to get more involved in the wedding plans, simply explain to him how much you’d like his help. More importantly, give him specific tasks that he can coordinate, such as planning the honeymoon, choosing the playlist for the reception, or overseeing the food selection for the rehearsal dinner or reception.