Something Blue

The wedding tradition “something old, something new, something borrowed, something blue” has been a part of weddings for ages.  However, in recent years, brides have embraced the tradition in new and more creative ways, adding a touch of fun and whimsy to their big day.  “Something blue” is a particular favorite of brides, so we’ve given you three creative ideas to add a touch of fun, tradition, and of course, color, to your big day.

It’s all about the bling. Many brides use their wedding day as a chance to wear jewelry that they may not normally don.  Shine and sparkle are seen in tiaras, drop earrings, bracelets, brooches, and necklaces.  Consider branching out from the traditional pearl or diamond jewelry to incorporate some blue bling.  Sapphires and blue topazes are to popular choices, with the former jewel a popular option among fall and winter brides and the latter jewel finding love from spring and summer brides.  David Yurman makes some incredible pieces with blue stones if you want an extra something special for the big day.

Remember, just a touch of blue is all you need, so don’t think you have to give up traditional diamonds and pearls all together.  Look for jewelry that has a single blue stone with clear or white jewels around it.  The blue bling doesn’t need to be a focal point, just a little touch to represent your “something blue.”  And if you can’t afford the real stone, no sweat, faux is a great way to go!  Still not sure?  Incorporate blue jewels in your bouquet in the form of a brooch.  Carefully pin it on the ribbon wrapping around your bouquet, and you’ve got your something blue, without making too drastic of a statement.

Embroider it. Consider combining your something blue with something else special in your life using thread.  Think of a special date, person, or saying that has meaning to you and represent it by embroidering something to wear or carry on your big day.  Perhaps it’s the initials of a loved one that passed, the letters of your college sorority, or your new initials.  Whatever it is, make it meaningful.  Inside one of the layers of your wedding dress is a great option if you don’t want the embroidery to be visible.  Also consider embroidering a handkerchief with something special to wrap around your bouquet.  The embroidery doesn’t need to be big or even visible to anyone else, it is for you to know about and cherish.

Two Blue Shoes. Elvis may have been onto something when he sang about blue suede shoes.  Ok, maybe not the suede part, but certainly the blue part!  Brides are beginning to get creative and venture outside of traditional bridal footwear, and what better way to do it than with blue!  This is another detail that may not be initially be visible to wedding guests, but when you step up stairs at the altar or bust a move on the dance floor, they will certainly notice the fun surprise.  This also opens up endless possibilities for footwear as you can look outside of the tradition bridal footwear.  Stuart Weitzman, Jimmy Choo, and Manolo Blanik all offer beautiful options.  (Think Carrie Bradshaw!)  If the price tag doesn’t appeal, consider browsing discount stores such as Nordstrom Rack and Filene’s Basement which often carry these designers for a fraction of the price.

Wedding Trends 2010

Homemade Wedding Favors

Though favors are an expense that’s easy to eliminate, right now couples are especially grateful to guests who have incurred considerable expense to be a part of the celebration. The 2010 wedding trend is using homemade favors to express that thanks, and to send guests home with your love.

Birdcage Veils

These vintage-look veils combine a jeweled clip or feathered headpiece with netting that only covers the face. In the picture above, Drew Barrymore is wearing a birdcage veil to a recent movie premiere. Wearing one allows you to have some dramatic glamor and feel like a bride, but is a more fun look and less hassling than a long traditional veil.

Mismatched Bridesmaid Dresses

For several years, brides have been selecting a bridesmaid dress designer and a fabric, then letting their bridesmaids choose the style that works best for their bodies. But the 2010 wedding trend takes idea further. Choose only a color, then let your bridesmaids find an off-the-rack dress of any designer that they like. Not only does this take some pressure off of you, but it also ensures that women are choosing a dress they like and they’ll be likely to actually wear again. If you follow this trend, be sure to tell your bridesmaids how formal the dress should be – you don’t want one bridesmaid wearing a casual sundress while another has on a beaded evening gown.

The End of the Standard Year-Long Engagement

Though a year is a good amount of time for an engagement (and thus that’s what I use for my wedding planning checklist) it certainly isn’t obligatory. Some couples will be planning quick elopements, while others will opt for longer engagements. There are advantages to both – a quick engagement means that you don’t overwhelm yourself with trying to plan the perfect wedding, and often means that you spend less money on unnecessary things. A long engagement can help relieve the stress, spreading out the tasks and the expenses. You’ll have time to save money, and hopefully be able to feel more secure about your jobs before you sign unbreakable contracts.

Strapless Wedding Dresses

If you’re saying to yourself, “This isn’t a new 2010 wedding trend!” you’re right. Strapless dresses have been extremely popular for several years now. And though more brides are opting for sleeves, straps, and other ways of covering the shoulders, strapless is going to continue to be the dominant style for the near future.

trash the dress

Trash The Dress

trash the dress
Trash The Dress…Looking for a way to put your wedding stress and anxiety behind you now that the big day is over? Photographer John Michael Cooper has an unlikely remedy: trash your wedding dress. The modern photographer created a concept that’s become a nationwide trend and is stirring up a bit of controversy.

John Michael Cooper’s ” trash the dress ” idea is exactly what it sounds like. Sometime after the wedding day is over, brides meet up with their photographer or videographer for an edgy, symbolic, or disturbing film session where they literally destroy their wedding gown. Many brides who participate in the new tradition say that the destruction of their dress signifies their freedom from the stress and anxiety of planning a wedding.

Each woman’s “trash the dress” day is unique and different. Some women choose water as their source of destruction, having their photographer snap pictures as they climb into a city fountain, roll on a sandy beach, or even wade into a dirty swamp. Others choose to have their new husbands help in the destruction, opting to be cut out of the dress with scissors or a knife or, in some extreme cases, set the garment on fire. Still others have chosen to rely on nature to ruin the gown by rolling in mud, sitting in dirt, or even hiking a dusty trail.

While it’s an unconventional method to overcome wedding-related stress, many brides find the “trash the dress” festivity to be cathartic and therapeutic. They also enjoy having a unique photo or video to remember their dress rather than preserving it in a box in their attics or closets. Not surprisingly, critics find the act offensive and irresponsible arguing that if brides no longer want their dress, they should donate them to charities or less-fortunate individuals. Here is a great place to donate your dress – White Chicago.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Style Me Pretty – Little Black Book

January  10, 2011

Music By Design was selected to be a member of Style Me Pretty’s exclusive 2011  Little Black Book.

What is the Little Black Book?

Our Little Black Book is a thoughtfully edited listing of only top quality vendors. Because our style-savvy, sophisticated readers deserve a chic resource they can trust, our book is created with them in mind. Our Little Black Book offers our readers a worry-free browsing experience while our Very Important Vendors enjoy a showcase in keeping with our firm commitment to quality vs. quantity. More than simply enjoying elite advertising space, our members are a handpicked community of artistic experts. In an industry saturated with long lists of anybody & everybody, our book is the most thoughtfully edited resource on the planet: a refreshingly couture idea.

How do you choose the vendors for your Little Black Book?

The process to become a Little Black Book member is actually quite extensive.

First, they need to have been recommended by an SMP reader, a recent bride or an industry professional. We don’t simply look for a referral but rather for a passionate reason as to why a particular vendor deserves to be in the book. Perhaps the designer worked with a reader’s best friend when she was getting married, perhaps they have already designed the world’s most beautiful invitations for a particular bride and groom, perhaps an event planner that we know shares with us the one photographer that she will work with. Whatever the connection, it must be strong and based on a real knowledge of the vendor’s work.

Second, we dive head first into the vendor’s business. Their portfolio, their experience, their time in the industry. We look at press that they’ve received, we chat with their industry neighbors, we get to know who they are and why they are good at what they do. We spend hours on the phone with each vendor, getting to know them, figuring out if they are honest, have a high level of integrity and are truly devoted to their craft. For highly competitive industries, like photography, we also have vetting teams. An unbiased group of style savvy vendors who can fairly, objectively, and accurately evaluate other’s work.

And finally, after feeling completely confident that a particular vendor is fabulous, we invite them to be a part of our book! It’s an invitation only book that truly prides itself on it’s commitment to quality above all else.