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Hat Etiquette At Weddings

Hat Etiquette At Weddings

Hat Etiquette At Weddings

What is more fun than a huge, elaborate hat? We love hats and besides the Kentucky Derby, weddings are a fantastic place to wear them. Whether you’re the bride or just a guest, hats are always in vogue. We have some hat etiquette tips to keep the big day low maintenance and hassle free.


The best thing to remember when picking out or designing a hat is that you are wearing it and not the other way around! If you are tall then avoid tall hats with wide brims. If you’re shorter, avoid large hats and go for more structured hats. You need to compliment your body type with your hat choice.

Should your mother or mother-in-law want to wear hats, they should pick ones that are smaller than yours, as the bride. This is true of guests as well – you never want to outshine the bride! In addition to wearing big, fancy hats it’s not unreasonable to ask your photographer to ask people to move their hats for better shots. Or the photographer may need to ask everyone in the shot to adjust their hats so faces are clear.

Another hat etiquette is when decorating your hat always defer to the right. You can choose from feathers, ribbons, felt bands or rhinestones, but keep to tradition and put all of that on the right. Men’s hats are embellished on the left.

When you design your hat or choose a big hat, keep in mind the tradition that the time of day dictates how large the hat must be. The later in the day, the smaller the hat is a general rule. Large brims in the morning and late evening are too extravagant since they are not needed to keep the sun out of your eyes.

And lastly, it is always customary to remove a hat when going inside a building. This does not apply to a lady’s hat as it is considered part of the outfit. Gentlemen, on the other hand, still need to remove their hats if they wear them. So go pick out that fantastic head piece you’ve always wanted and treat yourself to a bit of fancy!

A Toast

A Toast

What’s in a wedding toast? All eyes are on you. This is not the time to make a farce of the moment and pull a“Bridesmaid’s” sing-a-thon, who-sung it better. To avoid common mistakes: don’t pick up your glass until the very end; don’t cover your face with your notes; and don’t bring up reams of paper. Here are some additional tips to delivering a heart felt and memorable speech.

LEAVE THE EX’S BACK IN TEXAS If you remember one thing from this list, please remember this: Don’t talk about past lovers (yours or theirs), don’t talk about past proposals (even if they were turned down) and don’t talk about past spouses (“Mary is so much prettier than your last wife”).
NO SEX PLEASE, WE’RE GETTING MARRIED Everyone knows that sex is part of awedding night, but no
body wants to be reminded of it at the reception. And we certainly don’t want to hear about that drunken night in Cancún, or that morning in the conference room at work, when you walked in on the couple, ahem,updating their Facebook status.
STICK TO THE SCRIPT Tangents are not your friend. DON’T MAKE AMENDS While boasting about how close you are to the bride or bridegroom is déclassé, the opposite is even worse: apologizing for not being close enough. A wedding toast is no place for a laundry list of your failings as a friend or relative.
DON’T DRINK AND CLINK If you’ve had more than one drink, think twice before you clink. As any nutritionist would tell you, booze and a toast don’t go well together.
So what should you say? We advise to use a simple formula: 3-1-2. First, speak for a few minutes in third
person, sharing a funny story or a warm memory about the bride.“Let me tell you something about Becky you may not know.”or “I knew she had found true love that time she called me and said.” Next, say a few genuine words in first person, explaining your own feelings. “I have always admired my sister /friend for.”Finally, speak directly to the couple, using second person. “May you have a life filled with…”or “May you always find joy in…”
As for an ending, do as the British do for a wedding toast -raise your glass and offer a simple salutation,“Ladies and gentlemen, to the couple.”