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Saying thank you

Saying Thank You

saying thank you
Saying “thank you” is always in style! So don’t be ungrateful – say thanks for your wedding! Here’s how to give wedding thank you’s to all the people who’ve helped you put it together, given you gifts, or just have been a shoulder to lean on.
Wedding favors are the first thank you to your guests. So spoil them in return! It need not be anything expensive, even just a sweet, personalized thank you message on their place cards, a slice of wedding cake individually packaged, a mixed CD sharing all your favorite moments. Be clever about it: why not give away those expensive flower arrangements on the tables, by adding a little tag or bag with a message for your guests to please take them home with them. Create a sweetie or cookie bar where guests can indulge, give bottled home-made jams, cordials, ground coffee, specialty tea, olives, infused salt, cupcake mix or honey. Any small token of thanks will do, the trick is just to make it special, personal and lovely.
It may be the final piece of your wedding correspondence trousseau, but the thank you is certainly one of the most important. A beautifully written and presented thank you note is the last impression you will leave with your wedding guests — not to mention the first impression of you and your mate as a newlywed couple.
Most guests do not expect to receive a note before the wedding; they know that the couple is busy preparing for the special day. However, aim to mail your thank yous no later than three months after receiving a gift. When you return from your honeymoon, spend a concentrated 15 to 20 minutes per day on this task. Because you will need to write a thank you note for each and every gift received, writing in short periods allows for each note to remain lively and original. One way to expedite the process: Share the responsibility with your husband. (He can help by writing notes for those gifts from his family and friends.)
Many couples like the idea of matching the look, color and feel of invitations to the thank you notes. By doing so ahead of time, you can save money on design, ink and plate charges by ordering them alongside the wedding invitations. If you’d like to continue the tone set by your invitations but not match them exactly, select a similar ink color, type style and printing method that relates to your overall style. Methods for printing thank you notes are the same as for invitations—engraving, letterpress, embossing, off-set, and thermography—but if your invitations were engraved, save money by using thermography for your thank you notes to achieve the same look.
A popular trend in thank you note design is continuing the logo, pattern or motif first introduced on your invitations. Recently, a bride chose to recycle the Moroccan symbol of a hand used on her save the date cards. Another couple included the monogram used on its wedding invitations, simply tweaked with an updated color. It is this attention to detail (in addition to your heartfelt words) that will make your thank you’s more than just notes; they’ll be keepsakes for your guests.
Regardless of its design, a beautiful and graciously handwritten thank you note is a gift in itself.

saying thank you

 

Your Post-Wedding To-Do List

Now that you are engaged, most of your time and brainpower is probably going to planning the wedding. However, many brides forget about the things they should do after the wedding. Some of these tasks are enjoyable, while others just have to get done. To help you remember the things you have to do after the big day ends, here is your post-wedding to-do list.

1)      Write and Send Thank You Cards — Different people have different theories on how much time you have to send thank you cards. Basically, the sooner you get them out, the sooner you can stop worrying them. (And the sooner grandma will stop asking you about them.) Since this task can be time consuming, enlist your husband’s help.

2)      Take Care of Any Left Over Wedding Business — Once the wedding is over, pay any remaining balances and return all borrowed items. Your vendors will appreciate not having to hunt you down, and the people who lent you items won’t have to worry about you losing, breaking, or forgetting about the borrowed pieces.

3)      Play With All Those Pictures — One of the most fun post-wedding tasks is creating your wedding album and any photo gifts you plan to make for family and friends. Let your husband help you sort through all the great shots and decide how you want to display them.

4)      Preserve Those Keepsakes — There will be plenty of items from your wedding that you want to hold on to, so be prepared to preserve them after the wedding. Some options include preserving your gown or bouquet or creating a shadow box of mementos.

5)      Open All Those Gifts — This is possibly the best post-wedding task. You’ll love reading all the heartfelt messages in the wedding cards and opening and using all the great gifts people bought. Plus, you can usually expect to find some cash in those envelopes.

6)      Begin the Name Change Process — You’ve been looking forward to the day you’d become a Mrs., but if you decide to change your name, there is a long-list of to-dos. Once you visit the social security office and motor vehicle department, be sure to change your name on all important documents such as credit cards, bank information, insurance companies, etc.

7)      Consider Your Finances — Now that you are married, you may want to open a joint account with your husband. While it isn’t necessary to combine all of your money, a joint account will help you pay the bills you both will share. You may also want to create joint accounts for your insurance or phone bills. Often times, married couples can receive a discount by being on the same plan.

Don’t Be a Bride-to-be Who Misuses Social Media

Social media is a great way to stay connected with friends and family and to share and find ideas. However, there are always those people who abuse social media and annoy their followers. If they aren’t careful, brides-to-be can easily become that friend. Here are a few ways to avoid becoming the annoying bride on Facebook.

Wait to Change Your Relationship Status

Of course you are excited to change your status from “in a relationship” to “engaged,” but don’t do it too quickly. Make sure you share the news with close friends and relatives before posting it online. People who are important to you should hear the news from you and your fiancé not the internet.

 

Go Easy on the Ring Pictures

We know you love the new diamond engagement ring sparkling on your hand, but your Facebook friends don’t want to look at constant pictures of you modeling the rock. A close-up or two to share with friends and family who won’t get to see the ring in person is fine, but don’t become obsessed with modeling your new accessory.

Beware the Countdown

An occasional update on the nearing date is fine, but don’t be the bride who writes a countdown post every day. Also, on the day of, fight the urge to give minute by minute countdowns. No one wants to read their news feed and find “Three more hours until I get married” followed by “Two more hours until I get married.”

Send Thank You Cards

Posting about your shower and all the great gifts is fine, but don’t forget about thank you cards. A thank you on Facebook is not the same as a handwritten thank you in the mail.

A Few Pictures Will Suffice

Everyone wants to see pictures of your big day, especially people who weren’t able to attend, but they don’t want your photos constantly showing up in their newsfeed. Create one album and fill it with your favorites. You don’t need to include every single photo.

Enjoy Your Honeymoon

After the wedding, you should be looking forward to quality time with your new hubby not uploading photos and creating a new status every ten minutes. Take a break from social media while on vacation and share some photos and details when you return. No one expects constant updates while you’re honeymooning.

 

Thank You Card Etiquette

Just when you thought all of the stress of wedding planning was behind you, the daunting task of writing thank you notes looms in front of you. There’s nothing more exciting than returning from your honeymoon to a room full of beautiful presents all for you, but with every gift you rip open, a thank you card needs to be written. Here are a few tips for proper thank you card etiquette:

  • First things first, a personalized card is a must! We know it’s tempting to consider preprinting a couple hundred generic thank you notes, but when it comes to your wedding, only a handwritten, customized message will do. No emails, no phone calls, no fill-in-the-blank cards, and no generalized post on a website/blog/social networking site.
  • Address the gift giver by name, include a few words of appreciation, and acknowledge the gift specifically. A generic “Thank you for the gift” won’t do (unless the gift in question was money). If an actual gift was given, acknowledge it in the card.
  • A thank you card is required for every gift you receive, even if it’s from the same person. If your cousin Susie buys you a toaster at your bridal shower, then a month later gives you a place setting of china at your wedding, proper etiquette requires you to send two separate cards.
  • High-quality, formal stationery should be used for your wedding thank you cards. Often, you can purchase thank you notes to match your wedding invitations.
  • Monogrammed stationery with your new married names/initials is a great choice for thank you cards, but should not be used until after the wedding. Do not use stationery with your new name/initials for gifts that were received prior to the wedding.
  • All thank you cards should be written in blue or black ink. We know this rule seems silly, but we didn’t make it up.
  • For gifts that were received prior to the wedding, thank you cards should be sent out within two weeks. If a gift was shipped, it should be acknowledged as soon as possible. Follow up with a thank you card immediately, or, at the very least, a phone call that is followed up by a written note.
  • For gifts that were given at the actual wedding, you have slightly more time to mail out a thank you card. Contrary to what you might think, you don’t have an entire year to send out thank you notes. Thank you cards for wedding gifts should be sent out within three months of the event, but the sooner they’re sent out, the better.
  • Thank you cards should be sent to the following: anyone who purchases you a gift, whether given at your wedding/shower or mailed, even if you’ve thanked them in person; anyone who gives a monetary gift to you; participants/attendants in your wedding; individuals who contribute towards a group gift; anyone who organized a shower/party/celebration for you; individuals who house or entertain your wedding guests; wedding suppliers/vendors; anyone who offers favors/service to you leading up to your wedding or on the wedding day; and the person/people who host your wedding (typically your parents/guardians).
  • Thank you cards should be sent via postal mail. Be sure to include your new address as your wedding guests will be grateful to have it!